Tuesday, December 17, 2013

English III Issue Drilldown Project

Purpose: To generate a quality piece of researched scholarly writing that informs a wide audience concerning a little-understood matter of significant importance, while critically engaging and comparing texts related to that issue.

Goals:  
·         To investigate and share an important issue with a wide audience who is about your knowledge level and reading ability and who may not know much about that topic (fellow high school students, for instance)
·         To investigate published texts and their sources to see how other writers use or misuse those sources.
·         To critically analyze the texts you cite
·         To properly paraphrase and quote published texts in a piece of writing (MLA format)

Procedures:

1.      For your starting point, choose a journalistic article on a subject you’re interested in to investigate further. Your primary selection criterion here should be the subject’s interest or usefulness to you, but I would also like for you to choose a subject, or an approach to your subject, that your audience may not already know very much about.
2.      Find and read scientific (or other) articles that were sources of that article, along with any other quality sources that you need to consult so that you have a full understanding of the subject.
3.      Report your findings in a form and manner commensurate with academic integrity and professionalism. In other words, the final product should have credibility both as to content and to means of presentation—citation conventions, grammar and usage, and so on. You should quote and paraphrase your articles to support your assertions about them or based on them.

Success Criteria:

1.      Engagement. Your work should show that you eagerly pursued the process of the project and that you were authentically trying to investigate your subject.
2.      Depth. You should pursue the research for your project for the same purpose a professional writer or academician would: To first gain enough understanding to speak with intelligence and authority, and with reasonable knowledge of where the discussion on this subject now stands, so that you can then contribute to that conversation with intelligence and authority.

3.      Execution. Your finished project should adhere to the conventions of usage and style, avoid plagiarism (including accidental plagiarism), and competently apply MLA citation format.

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Grammar and Composition Revised FinalDue Dates Schedule

Thursday, December 12th: Issue Drilldown Topic Proposal
Friday, December 13th: Fair Copy, Typed Draft of Lyric Poem
Monday, December 16th: Annotated Bibliography Typed Rough Draft
Tuesday, December 17th: Lyric Poem Penultimate Draft
Wednesday, December 18th: Issue Drilldown Penultimate Draft
Friday, December 20th: Confirmation Bias Inquiry Project Penultimate Draft
Monday, January 6th: Completed Academic Portfolio with Final Drafts of All Projects:
            Confirmation Bias Inquiry
            Issue Drilldown Project
            Annotated Bibliography

            Lyric Poem (Or approved alternative)

Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Issue Drilldown Project

Purpose: To generate a quality piece of researched scholarly writing that informs a wide audience concerning a little-understood matter of significant importance.

Procedures:

1.      For your starting point, choose one of the current journalistic articles you or a classmate brought in to investigate further. Your primary selection criterion here should be the subject’s interest or usefulness to you, but I would also like for you to choose a subject, or an approach to your subject, that your audience may not already know very much about.
2.      Find and read scientific (or other) articles that were sources of that article, along with any other quality sources that you need to consult so that you have a full understanding of the subject.
a.       As you would if this writing were for a professional or academic publication, you should read more articles on your subject than you will need to cite in your paper. (Those of you who read more articles than you cite should produce a “Works Consulted” page so I’ll know how deeply you pursued your subject.) The goal for this reading is to cultivate enough knowledge of your subject that you can speak with understanding and authority, and with a good idea of where the published discussion on this issue stands.
b.      Because this article is aimed at a wider, non-academic audience, you do not need to provide a Literature Review section, though you should review plenty of literature for it. Presenting me with your notes on this reading as you hand in your finished project would be an excellent way to make your case that you satisfied Success Criterion 1, below.
c.       An important part of your project will be to note any gaps in fact or emphasis between the journalistic accounts of the subject and the sources underlying them.
3.      Report your findings in a form and manner commensurate with academic integrity and professionalism. In other words, the final product should exude credibility both as to content and to means of presentation—citation conventions, grammar and usage, and so on.

Success Criteria:

1.      Engagement. Your work should show that you eagerly pursued the process of the project and that you were authentically trying to investigate your subject.
2.      Depth. You should pursue your project for the same purpose a professional writer or academician would: To first gain enough understanding to speak with intelligence and authority, and with reasonable knowledge of where the discussion on this subject now stands, and then to contribute to that conversation with intelligence and authority.

3.      Execution. Your finished project should adhere to the conventions of usage and style, avoid plagiarism (including accidental plagiarism), and competently apply the citation format of your choice (MLA, APA, or Chicago).

Monday, November 25, 2013

Confirmation Bias Strategies Section

Advice:
  • Strategies should emerge from the specific life situations you discussed in the Life Application section.
  • The strategies should be specific, concrete, maybe even testable, as opposed to abstract vows of non-bias.
  • Optionally, you could actually try one of these strategies and report how it went in your strategies section.

Due Tomorrow in Grammar and Comp.

A typed draft of your entire Confirmation Bias Inquiry Project!
Main Sections:
1.      Literature Review
2.      Confirmation Bias in My Life (Life Application)
3.      Strategies for Addressing My Confirmation Bias
The next step will be to provide an introduction and conclusion for the entire project, and to make sure there’s reasonable flow between the sections. The more of this work you can have done before Thanksgiving break, the better.


Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Poem Analysis Instructions

  1. Identify and underline 2-3 instances of concrete imagery in your poem.
  2. Analyze: a) What senses does this imagery appeal to? b) what is the emotional effect, if any, of this imagery? c) Overall, does the poem consist mainly of concrete imagery?
  3. Identify and underline 1 or 2 instances of figurative language in your poem.
  4. Analyze: How does each of those instances measure up in terms of authenticity and uniqueness?
  5. Evaluate: How well does your poem meet each of the success criteria for this assignment: About a specific moment of your own experience; 15 lines; mainly concrete imagery; one or two instances of figurative language that is unique and authentic to the moment

Computer Lab Options

1. Produce a corrected draft of your literature review.
2. Produce a fair copy of your lyric poem draft.
3. Find new articles to read for your final drilldown project, and annotate those.
4.  Begin to annotate the articles you have already read.